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ITEM # 
SA678080

Circle Of Francesco Renaldi ., 1755 - Circa 1799 a Portrait Of Two Musicians Performing A Violin And Cello Duet In An Interior oil On Panel 58 X 50 Cm. (23 X 20 In.)

Price

£3,500 | $4,660 USD | €3,966 EUR
Item Number: SA678080
Date of manufacture: 18th Century
Current Status: For sale
Seller: Artware Fineart
This antique has been viewed 17 times in the past month with the most views from France.

Description

Circle of Francesco Renaldi ., 1755 - circa 1799
A Portrait of Two Musicians performing a Violin and Cello duet in an Interior
oil on panel
58 x 50 cm. (23 x 20 in.)
Chamber music is a form of classical music that is composed for a small group of instruments—traditionally a group that could fit in a palace chamber or a large room. Most broadly, it includes any art music that is performed by a small number of performers, with one performer to a part (in contrast to orchestral music, in which each string part is played by a number of performers). However, by convention, it usually does not include solo instrument performances.
Because of its intimate nature, chamber music has been described as "the music of friends". For more than 100 years, chamber music was played primarily by amateur musicians in their homes, and even today, when chamber music performance has migrated from the home to the concert hall, many musicians, amateur and professional, still play chamber music for their own pleasure. Playing chamber music requires special skills, both musical and social, that differ from the skills required for playing solo or symphonic works.
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe described chamber music (specifically, string quartet music) as "four rational people conversing".This conversational paradigm – which refers to the way one instrument introduces a melody or motif and then other instruments subsequently "respond" with a similar motif – has been a thread woven through the history of chamber music composition from the end of the 18th century to the present. The analogy to conversation recurs in descriptions and analyses of chamber music compositions.
During the Baroque period, chamber music as a genre was not clearly defined. Often, works could be played on any variety of instruments, in orchestral or chamber ensembles. The Art of Fugue by Johann Sebastian Bach, for example, can be played on a keyboard instrument (harpsichord or organ) or by a string quartet or a string orchestra. The instrumentation of trio sonatas was also often flexibly specified; some of Handel's sonatas are scored for "German flute, Hoboy [oboe] or Violin" Bass lines could be played by violone, cello, theorbo, or bassoon, and sometimes three or four instruments would join in the bass line in unison. Sometimes composers mixed movements for chamber ensembles with orchestral movements. Telemann's 'Tafelmusik' (1733), for example, has five sets of movements for various combinations of instruments, ending with a full orchestral section.
J. S. Bach: Trio sonata on YouTube from The Musical Offering, played by Ensemble Brillante
Baroque chamber music was often contrapuntal; that is, each instrument played the same melodic materials at different times, creating a complex, interwoven fabric of sound. Because each instrument was playing essentially the same melodies, all the instruments were equal. In the trio sonata, there is often no ascendent or solo instrument, but all three instruments share equal importance.

Baroque musicians playing a trio sonata, 18th century anonymous painting
The harmonic role played by the keyboard or other chording instrument was subsidiary, and usually the keyboard part was not even written out; rather, the chordal structure of the piece was specified by numeric codes over the bass line, called figured bass.
In the second half of the 18th century, tastes began to change: many composers preferred a new, lighter Galant style, with "thinner texture, ... and clearly defined melody and bass" to the complexities of counterpoint. Now a new custom arose that gave birth to a new form of chamber music: the serenade. Patrons invited street musicians to play evening concerts below the balconies of their homes, their friends and their lovers. Patrons and musicians commissioned composers to write suitable suites of dances and
Internal Ref: 4145



Declaration

This item is antique. The date of manufacture has been declared as 18th Century.


Dimensions

Height = 58 cm (22.8")
Width = 50 cm (19.7")
Depth = 1 cm (0.4")


Seller Details

Artware Fineart
18 La Gare
51 Surrey Row
London
SE1 0BZ
United Kingdom
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www.artwarefineart.com


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